Tricky Rijeka

Yesterday we arrived back home from 22nd Rijeka’s Regatta. I’m really happy now because I was able to reach my goals. Much more than I expected.

In my previous blog post I wrote about what were my two aims for this Regatta. First I wanted to gain some speed in stronger conditions because I worked hard previously to figure out why I struggle when the stronger wind appear. Fortunately I reached this aim, on the second day with B rig I didn’t feel disadvantage in my boat speed compared to others. More tension on the shrouds brought the expected result.

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My other goal was to finish in top 5. I had never finished better than 7th place on a croatian regatta. The conditions were tricky on this competiton, we had shifty wind all the time, lots of races were abandoned before the first mark because the wind shifted so much. In Hungary we usually have shifty wind conditions, I raced lots of times in these, therefore I didn’t feel bad about it. Honestly I enjoyed the races. Unfortunately this caused that we had just the qualification rounds, and can’t race in golden and silver fleet. The results finally based on the 6 qualification round results.

This time finally I was able to finish 4th in overall, I’m so happy about it! This is my best result ever in a croatian regatta.

For me the IOM spring season in Croatia is over, but I will surely compete there in autumn. Now I’m focusing on the 21. International Pichlingersee Regatta.

Here you can find the overall results: 22nd Rijeka’s Regatta results

Check Compass Magazin’s facebook page for pictures: Pictures on Compass Magazin

Thanks to my girlfriend for her support, and for the awesome pictures she photographed!

Thanks to the race organizers for this regatta! Next year I hope we will compete in Rijeka again!

Thanks to the hungarian team for their support, and for the awesome mood!

Live your dreams!

Csóka László

Battery wars Chapter 1.

Do you ever feel the pain when your battery betrayed you during a key moment at an RC sailing competition? I hope not, because I felt it two times during the years, it was horrible.

So what can we do to avoid this disaster?

In Hungary we are at the beginning of the new season in RC sailing and it’s time for thinking about the batteries. Old batteries can cause suffering at the first competitions if they aren’t in good conditions.

But what does „not in a good condition” mean in case of a battery? There is a method with multimeter to detect the bad cells, but not nearly everybody has this device, and also just a few RC sailors can use it correctly. I don’t like this method.

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I use my battery charger to detect bad batteries. I think this is an easy way and everybody can do it during winter battery maintenance. Just an ordinary programmable charger is good for this which is able to discharge batteries beside the charging function. This is how I detect bad batteries:

  1. Discharge the battery: I discharge the NIMH batteries to 1.0V/cell, in case of Life and Lipo batteries this voltage value is built in the charger.

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  1. Charge the battery: I charge it like in any other normal case

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  1. At the end of the charging method check how much mAh got into the battery. Compare it with the real value written on the battery: At this point I have a feedback of the condition of the battery.

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  1. Discharge the battery again.

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  1. At this point I have the full feedback of the battery condition, because I know how much mAh was in the battery and how much could it perform from it during the discharge.
  1. It’s judgment time: In step 5. if the battery performance is under 80-90% comparing to the step 3 than it’s time for thinking about buying a new one. If the performance is above 90% than it is still OK and I just made a battery maintenance with discharging and charging. (In the example pictures the batteries are 700mAh Life 2S packs, at the second discharge the 650mAh discharge value is over 90%, so I should keep that pack.) This case I always charge the batteries again, they don’t like to be fully discharged for a longer time.

I hope this post will be useful for you in RC sailing! In my next one I would like to show which type of batteries I use in my RC boats.

Live your dreams!

Csóka László

Starting point

I’m glad to say my english language site is now open. I hope you will enjoy the blog as much as I enjoy writing my impressions about RC Sailing in it. In the future I would like to show my RC Sailing life.

At this poincsoka-laszlo-starting-point-3t I’m preparing for Rijeka IOM Regatta with Hungarian friends. We have 3 more weeks for preparing method. In Rogoznica I really enjoyed competing with the croatian RC sailors in January. For me it was the first time when I truly felt that the gap between me and them started to shrink.
In the first two days in slow wind conditions (we have lots of slow wind condition competition in Hungary) I was able to race with the top sailors and of course I was really happy about itt hat I was ont he 3rd place in overall after two days of competing, and the only foreigner in the Golden fleet of the Croatian Nationals.

On the third day of Rogoznica the wind conditions changed, the wind started to blow stronger and my great form disappeared. I lost some speed with the boat, and mentally I coludn’t control my races, everything happened much faster. Luckily it was a really instructive competition for me, I learnt a lot, and I was happy that I made my best result in Croatia ever with a 7th place overall.

csoka-laszlo-starting-point-2After Rogoznica I thought much about my boats speed. My Kantun S was fast in slow wind conditions but when the wind became stronger (we used „A” rigs it wasn’t a need for „B”) it’s speed slowly melted. Now I’m triing to figure out what happened, in the hungarian fleet I usually don’t have boat speed problems in these conditions.

When I will have the solution for this problem I’m going to share with you immediately.

Live your dreams!

Csóka László